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20130121
20130129
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. >> this is what we get ready for because people get their tax returns and get the money, and so that's the big hit as well. people come to buy cars because there's not enough inventory. compared to other cars a good 30 or 40 cars. >> reporter: if you have any information about this robbery, you are asked to call the alameda county sheriff's department live in hayworth, kimberly tere, nbc bay area n s news. >>> we want to take you live to washington, d.c., now. some great pictures coming to us from the commander in chief's ball. this is one of the two inaugural balls for president obama, and you see the first lady there, jennifer hudson is singing, and a nice dance. they've been dancing the last few minutes. it looks like they're just wrapping up. they got to this ball about 20 minutes ago. it's the commander in chief's ball, open to anyone in the military, of course with an invitation, it's open for you. let's listen in briefly to the president and the first lady. ♪ >> a wonderful day and an amazing evening for both of them, and it's been a long day for them. and from this commander in chief's
's what we're asking people to do. >> you might recall that voters approved a parcel tax last year that will bring the city college $16 million a year starting in december, and it could potentially offset part of the wage cuts. but to me, that's all peripheral. city college and its teachers are arguing over a few million dollars a year when it will take tens of millions in savings and structural changes as well to save ccfs. the trombone debate is emblematic of a larger problem. the college will likely not get the fiscal house in order. sam brock, and that is today's reality check. >> thanks, sam. >>> switching to the csu system, it said it needs more money, a lot more money. california state university leaders made a demand at a meeting today. they say in order to fund the next academic year, they need $371 million in total. governor jerry brown fired back that the demand is more of a dream than a reality. the money would cover salary raises, and maintenance and equipment for the 23 campuses. brown has agreed to give an extra $125 million under the condition that tuition not be ra
. i think it's something us as tax paying citizens should not have. >> reporter: the broken window theory which says if less serious crimes are not dealt with the overall crime rate will increase. bratton's opponent seemed most concerned of his stop and frisk policy because they fear it will lead to racial profiling. >> you're bringing in somebody very controversial. >> this particular plan not about bill bratton. it's about partnership. >> reporter: i spoke by phone earlier today to bill bratton's wife and she tells me he is in detroit working on a project similar to the one he will be working on here in oakland and, again, raj and jessica, he will be here in oakland in mid-february. monte francis, nbc bay area news. >> okay, thank you, monte. look who is back in town. all the talk might be about the niners right now but the men in teal are back on the ice in san jose. the shortened home season will begin tomorrow. boy, not only shark fans but downtown owners, business owners, they really need this. >> reporter: yeah, you know, jessica, the city is really hoping this brings some l
implemented all kinds of savory cuts and needed tax hikes to improve the financial picture. but then we'd be doing you a disservice because.comrams the governor made today aren't true. >> the honorable edmund g. brown junior. >> there was plenty of applause to go around at the state of the state address on thursday and it came from many different sources. the legislature, featured guests, governor brown himself. >> let's not applaud too much. >> but before the governor goes tooting his own horn, let's hear what he tells state lawmakers. >> you cast difficult votes to cut billions from the state's budget. you curbed prison spending through a historic realignment. >> this claim of cost reductions is murky at best. now, technically, the state dropped its corrections budget from $10 billion last year to a projected figure of $9 billion this year. or a drop of 10%. but even if you consider those savings historic, there's more to the governor's claim than meets the eye. >> it's somewhat not honest in many ways because while we have cut the state budget to prisons, we've actually increased the
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4